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7 TIPS ON PROMOTING YOUR ONLINE EVENT

1. MAKE A PLAN

Don’t just share haphazardly, use the tips below to write out a plan for how you will promote your event and follow it through.

2. CREATE CONTENT, NOT JUST INFORMATION

“I’m doing a concert online” is not particularly engaging, it’s just dry info. Try to include some engaging content in everything you post online. Every post can include either a story, an image, a video and/or a question. These are the formats that will keep people looking. With that in mind, look for content opportunities as you prepare your event. Did something exciting, funny or painful happen during practice - tell people! Could you invite people to give you suggestions on what to play? Or what to wear? Watch out for little things that can make good content, and take a photo to share if you can.

3. TELL PEOPLE EXACTLY WHAT YOU WANT THEM TO DO

Having said everything above, remember that you want people to respond with some kind of action. At different points you might want people to like your page, share your post, click a link, buy a ticket etc. Decide which action you most want to generate and ask people clearly, but not aggressively, to do that one thing. Make sure all the links work and are easy to find.

4. GET THE RIGHT BALANCE

Promoting yourself as an artist can be a difficult thing to do. We tend to under-promote because we’re afraid of causing a negative reaction, or being seen as ‘spammy’. If this rings a bell for you then try this simple approach - push just outside of your comfort zone. That way you’re listening to your instincts but taking one step further than you naturally would. That might mean sending a follow-up message when you feel a bit nervous about it.

5. GET PERSONAL

Social media might have the appeal of a quick way to connect with lots of people, but those connections can be superficial. The best way to get a response can often be a personal text message or email. Make a list of people you know who might be interested in your event - friends, family, work colleagues etc. Then contact each of those people individually. This takes time, and copy-and-paste can help, but try to make it as personal as you can.

6. KNOW WHAT YOU ARE SELLING

You might think the answer is ‘an online concert’, but it’s actually a bit deeper than that! People use music for different reasons - for comfort, inspiration, to celebrate an event, to reminisce etc. Think of some of the most profound musical listening experiences you’ve had. How did it affect you? Were you moved in a particular way? Apply this kind of thinking to your own event. What kind of experience are you creating for your audience, then sell that. It could be as simple as adding an adjective to your event description, but you can get creative with how you communicate this message.

7. KEEP LEARNING

Having a great promotion plan is not a guarantee of success. You might create some great content and still have a lacklustre response. There are other factors at work. If you haven’t seen the results you wanted, try not to stress over it too much, but use the experience to help shape future projects. Above all, remember that engagement numbers do not define the value of you and your art.

Guide contributed by Andy Lowe